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Are You HIP?: How One Latinx Learning Community Integrates Ten High-Impact Practices to Foster Student Success

Abstract

This practice report shares practices from a successful Latinx Studies learning community model at an urban research-intensive university in the Midwestern United States. The learning community model offers a tiered developmental curriculum to support the three different stages of a student’s journey, from enrollment to graduation. The three distinct phases of the learning community model are: a pre-college summer enrichment program, a first- and second-year college scholars program and a third and fourth-year college-to-career component. The model also integrates 10 out of 11 of Kuh’s (2008) high impact practices demonstrated to support student engagement and success for students making a direct transition from high school to university. The authors share gains in student retention and five-year graduation rates as evidence of effectiveness.

Published: 2022-02-28
Pages:74 to 79
Section:Practice Reports
How to Cite
Gonzales, S. M., Baier, S. T., & Brammer, E. C. (2022). Are You HIP?: How One Latinx Learning Community Integrates Ten High-Impact Practices to Foster Student Success. Student Success, 13(1), 74-79. https://doi.org/10.5204/ssj.1907

Author Biographies

Wayne State University
United States United States

Dr. Sandra M. Gonzales is an Associate Professor of Bilingual Bicultural Teacher Education at Wayne State University. Her research interests include: Latinx identity and belonging; K12 school reform efforts; culturally and linguistically responsive teaching and learning practices; and, the revitalization of elder and abuelita epistemologies, such as testimonio, stories and storytelling, centering on Detroit’s Chicanx, Mexican and Indigenous Mexican community.

Michigan State University
United States United States

Dr. Stefanie T. Baier is the Director of Instructional Development for Graduate Students and Postdocs at the Graduate School at Michigan State University to help prepare these for future faculty roles and advance their instructional skills. Her research interests include student success and retention and the impact of diversity, academic, and psychosocial factors on college outcomes, and international student success.

University of Michigan
United States United States
Dr. Ethriam Cash Brammer currently serves as an Assistant Dean for the Rackham Graduate School at the University of Michigan, where he is also the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Implementation Lead. In addition to his student success scholarship and advocacy, Dr. Brammer is also a literary scholar dedicated to giving voice to historically marginalized U.S. Latinx narratives through translation.  
Open Access Journal
ISSN 2205-0795