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2019 Special Issue: Psychological Wellbeing and Distress in Higher Education

Abstract

Many universities around the world have now initiated wellbeing strategies that encompass psychological wellbeing. These resources can be leveraged for change to better support students. Associate Professor Lydia Woodyatt from Flinders University, Adelaide and Dr Abi Brooker from the University of Melbourne are guest editors for this very special issue which includes a collection of articles from scholars and practitioners in Australia, Canada, the US, UK and Germany addressing student (and staff) psychological wellbeing in higher education. Broadly, articles discuss the scope of  mental wellbeing and psychological distress, identify specific cohorts (including international students and refugees), profile targeted means of support (via the curriculum, the co-curriculum and strategic policy and planning initiatives) and also identify the need for ‘psychological literacy’ via leadership.

Published:
Pages:i to vi
Section: Editorial
0 citation(s) in Scopus
0 citation(s) in Web of Science

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Author Biographies

The University of Melbourne
Australia Australia

Dr Abi Brooker is a lecturer at the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences. She lectures in developmental psychology and psychopathology.  Trained in lifespan developmental psychology, her research interests include the relationship between curriculum and psychological wellbeing in universities, the relationship between psychological wellbeing and psychological distress, and the challenges of young adulthood in the 21st century.

Flinders University
Australia Australia

Associate Professor Lydia Woodyatt is a lecturer in Psychology at Flinders University in the College of Education, Psychology and Social Work. She is the Director of First Year Studies in Psychology, where she develops curriculum embedded approaches to support students’ transition into and out of university. Her research focusses on emotions and wellbeing, particularly after failure.