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Student Nurse Perceptions of Video Simulation and Critical Reflection for Developing Clinical-Reasoning Skills: A Cross Cohort Study

Abstract

Clinical-reasoning (CR) provides a framework for higher-order critical thinking that fosters a nurse’s ability to assess, process and remedy clinical encounters and is considered essential for the provision of quality healthcare. This study aimed to determine whether student nurses regard the inclusion of video-simulation with critical-reflection as a valuable opportunity to develop their CR skills. An existing case-based assessment was redesigned to include short video-simulations where deliberate but subtle CR flaws were included, requiring students to identify strengths and weaknesses of their own CR process. Following completion of the assessment a modified student satisfaction and self-confidence Likert scale survey with open-ended questions was conducted to identify perceptions towards the assessment task. Incorporating video-simulation and critical-reflection was perceived as a useful opportunity to develop CR skills by student nurses. Albeit, students studying in a traditional three year Bachelor of Nursing cohort were more positive of the opportunity than their peers in a two year fast-track cohort.

Published: 2021-03-15
Pages:47 to 55
Section:Articles
How to Cite
Macartney, M. J., Cooper, J. F., & Namasivayam, P. (2021). Student Nurse Perceptions of Video Simulation and Critical Reflection for Developing Clinical-Reasoning Skills: A Cross Cohort Study. Student Success, 12(1), 47-55. https://doi.org/10.5204/ssj.1653

Author Biographies

University of Tasmania
Australia Australia

Michael Macartney is a Biomedical Sciences Lecturer in the School of Health Sciences at the University of Tasmania, Australia. His teaching and learning research interests include improving critical-thinking and lifelong learning skills in students completing medical science units.

University of Tasmania
Australia Australia

John Cooper is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Nursing at the University of Tasmania, Australia. His research interests include exploring professional relationships and their impact on undergraduate professional development during clinical placements and the use of simulated learning environments to facilitate development of critical thinking skills.

University of Tasmania
Australia Australia

Pathma Namasivayam is a Lecturer in the School of Nursing at the University of Tasmania, Australia. Her research interests in learning and teaching include student engagement using technology, simulation based clinical education and palliative care education. 

Open Access Journal
ISSN 2205-0795